Martin Le Poidevin was born in Essex and educated at Colchester Royal Grammar School and Bristol University, where he gained a First Class Degree in Music.

Martin is a well-known oratorio soloist in the west country, with a wide repertoire. He has also sung as soloist with internationally renowned orchestras and groups including The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, the Brno Symphony Orchestra and the Tallis Scholars and as part of the solo line-up with I Fagiolini.

As well as an oratorio soloist Martin has sung a wide range of operatic roles, including Ford (Falstaff), The Count (Marriage of Figaro), Don Alfonso (Cosi Fan Tutte) and Aeneas (Dido and Aeneas). He has created a number of roles, and is currently working Mark Lawrence’s Hall on the Hill, to be premiered next February for the re-opening of St Georges in Bristol. He is also a recitalist – he specialises in the classical song cycles and English song. He has recently been working with poet Ian McMillan on a Twitter-based song cycle called Early Stroll Songs, which has had several performances around the country.

Alongside his professional singing engagements, Martin is a member of the music staff at Clifton Cathedral with whom he has made countless recordings and broadcasts. He regularly directs the diocesan choir and visits and advises parishes on their music-making. He is a published composer. His St Luke Passion was premiered at the Clifton International Festival of Music, and his An Evening Requiem was premiered on his 50th birthday, with an invited cast of singers and players. He is founder of the Bristol Song Recital Series.

Martin is also a singing teacher with well over 50 students on his books, and runs a small internet programming agency specialising in music projects. He is married with five children.

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Early Stroll Recordings

I sang the premiere of the Early Stroll Songs in St Georges in October. Now we're releasing the recordings, a song a day, via Twitter (#earlystrollsongs). You can hear some of the highlights on Soundcloud. More from earlystrollsongs.co.uk

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